Choosing Typefaces for Layout

When starting on a new book project, one of the first things I think of are the typefaces for the interior. How to choose what to use to convey the information to the reader? How heavy should the type look in a character, line, paragraph, and on the page as a whole?

I see four major areas for copy treatment when it comes to roleplaying games: the body copy, the headings, the sidebars, and the tables. Depending on the game, there may be statblocks that need to be detailed, but for the most part a treatment that incorporates the sidebar and table styles are a good starting point for these. I do not consider statblocks as high in the hierarchy of design elements as tables or sidebars are.

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#RPGaDAY 2017, Day 30: A Game Everyone Else Likes

I know, this day’s #RPGaDAY question is supposed to be about a genre-mashup, but it seems that there’s been a few questions that touch on that and I’d rather talk about Marvel Super Heroes RPG, the first of the superhero roleplaying games that used the Marvel Comics IP.

Whenever I see this game system mentioned, people reflect on it with a sense nostalgia that I never had. I’d be willing to say that you’re thinking about good ol’ FASERIP now with a smile slowly spreading across your face. But for me, this was the game where I learned an important Truth in Gaming: dice tell crappy stories.

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#RPGaDAY 2017, Day 29: Kickstarter

For the 29th of last month’s #RPGaDAY entry, the prompt was about the best-run rpg Kickstarater campaign I’ve backed. When I work on layout — and I come under contract before or duing the campaign — I always back the project for one dollar so I can see what communication goes out to the backers.

So far, I’ve only come onto two projects that funded through Kickstarter after the campaign ended: Bluebeard’s Bride and Bulldogs. It’s interesting to see how both campaigns handle communication with backers: Bluebeard’s Bride has everything done publicly — which I think makes it a marketing opportunity for post-KS sales — while Bulldogs has had several that were backer-only. Just because I can see Bulldogs, I’ll use this as an example: why not make that 2016 “Current Print Status” available for anyone to see when they can purchase the game in stores? I don’t know, but some creators like to have backer-only updates. As a person on the creative side, I’d like to see what they’re saying to backers.

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