2017 ENnie Awards and Layout Influence on a Line

7th Sea was nominated for seven ENnies. Products I worked on have been nominated for (and won) ENnies in the past, but not all of the awards are things I feel I should get an award for. Like last year Urban Shadows was up for Best Rules and Product of the Year. If Urban Shadows had won Product of the Year, I would have gone out and gotten a copy of the medal because layout has to do with creating the whole product. It won Best Rules, which had nothing to do with me, so I am okay with no award for Thomas. 7th Sea's Mark Richardson, our staff cartographer, was nominated for Best Cartography this year. Discussing the nominations, we realized this is the only award with nominations for 7th Sea products that was as close to 100% a single person's award. Mark may have had guidance and feedback from others on the John Wick Presents team, but it's as...
Read More

#RPGaDAY 2016, Day 18: Using Relationship Maps

This question is spawned from the IndieGameADay thing, which pokes fun at ((I'm being charitable.)) #RPGaDAY with questions such as What kind of shit-fit did you throw the last time someone tried to schedule your convention game in a ballroom like you’re playing fucking Pathfinder or something? What was the very saddest thing you wrote on an index card? and What is your fondest memory of a game you thought was fun before you knew better? But they had a really interesting question for day 2 -- once you take out the snark -- about relationship maps which was What game created your most elaborate relationship map? How much of it did you actually use? Well now! Continue reading “#RPGaDAY 2016, Day 18: Using Relationship Maps” »...
Read More

#RPGaDAY 2016, Day 15: Player-Driven Gaming

Well, it has been quite a bit of time since I've been able to write about #RPGaDAY. Truthfully, I was busy laying out roleplaying game books and other miscellany. One of these projects was Unknown Armies, which has a group setting and character creation section that's really fun, which leads into this day's question about the role of a GM in your games. I started gaming in the 1980's. Back then, the way to play roleplaying games was you players were just that: playing in the GM's story. The person making up the game world and the story was a Dungeon Master or a Game Master. That guy was never referred to as a "player". Most games didn't allow for any player to affect the world except for reacting. Continue reading “#RPGaDAY 2016, Day 15: Player-Driven Gaming” »...
Read More